National Poultry Day

March 19th is National Poultry Day! It’s a day when we recognize domesticated birds that are raised for meat or eggs. “Poultry” includes chickens, turkeys, ducks, geese, quail, pheasants, guineafowl, squab, and other domesticated birds.

National Band & Tag manufactures a variety of products for poultry identification such as wing bands, leg bands, and clip-on blinders. We started out selling wing bands and leg bands for chickens back in 1902. To celebrate National Poultry Day, we are recognizing chickens by creating a side by side history timeline of chickens, NB&T, and how the industry grew in the 1900s.

History of Chickens, the Broiler Industry, and National Band & Tag in the 1900s

(Click the pictures below to make them larger.)

National Poultry Day - Chicken Timeline from 1900s

National Poultry Day - History of Chickens

 

 

Chickens & The Broiler Industry History:

1800s – 1900s:  Chickens are mostly owned by backyard farmers who use them for eggs. They are considered a delicacy, usually only eaten for holidays, special occasions, or when they are no longer producing eggs. By the beginning of the 1900s, a few entrepreneurs start selling young chickens in the summers for meat as a side business for their family farms.

1916: Pedigree chicken breeding starts. Founded when Robert C. Cobb Senior purchased a farm in Littleton, MA, forming Cobb’s Pedigreed Chicks.

1920s: Vitamin D was discovered in the early 1920s, which led to a revolution in poultry keeping. Hens could now survive through the winter months with Vitamin D supplements and go on to produce healthier chicks in the spring. Now that they can be raised indoors, people start building designated chicken coops. This all helped reduce the high mortality rate of chickens.

1923: Cecile Steele is the pioneer of the commercial broiler industry. Steele ordered 50 chicks for egg production; by mistake, she received 500 chicks. Instead of returning them, she saw an opportunity. She waited until the chickens reached 2 pounds live weight and sold them for a profit at 62 cents a pound. She increased her numbers in 1924 to 1,000 chicks, 10,000 in 1926, and 26,000 in 1928.

1939-1945: WW2 creates a ration on beef, pork, and lamb. People are encouraged to raise and eat more chicken. By the end of the war, Americans are eating 3 times more chicken than they were before the war.

1942: The government approves a new form of cleaning and packing ready-to-cook whole chickens in ice in wooden crates.

1948: Post war, “Chicken of Tomorrow” contest encourages breeders to create bigger, better broilers. Arbor Acres White Rocks’ white-feathered birds beat out the higher-performing Red Cornish crosses from the Vantress Hatchery. These two breeds would eventually be crossed and become the Arbor Acre breed whose genetics now dominate poultry farms worldwide today.

1950: Broilers are now the #1 source of poultry meat. Almost all Americans now have a modern, bottom cooling refrigerator, which has set a new standard of food storage and food safety

1952: The commercial broiler industry begins its economic boom. Specially bred meat chickens (“broilers”) surpass farm chickens as the number one source of chicken meat in the United States.

1970s: The broiler industry focuses on nutritional discoveries, disease eradication programs, and genetic improvements.

1980s: Consumers are starting to prefer cut-up and further-processed chickens to the traditional whole bird. Chicken surpasses pork consumption in 1985.

1990s: Chicken becomes the top-selling meat, surpassing beef. The movement towards natural, organic birds and eggs begins with more attention towards animal welfare.

 

National Band & Tag History:

1902: Joseph Haas starts to manufacture poultry leg and wing bands. He had been informed that breeders were improving their flocks, and it was necessary to distinguish one fowl from another. Visualizing the possibilities of a new industry, Haas went to work designing a few patterns of bands. Crude at first, they improved with recommendations from customers and experimental projects. He continued to make improvements until he came up with bands that worked. Ads were placed in poultry magazines, and although he had no competition, orders were slow.

1914: National Band & Tag makes its first move from a small barn to a garage, still in Newport, KY. NB&T now employs 3 people, one being Haas’s youngest son who was 11 years old.

1926: Business takes off for National Band & Tag! With the start of the broiler industry, more and more people are now raising chickens. The business moves from the garage to a building on Orchard St. in Newport, KY. Haas’s eldest son joins the business, and NB&T now employs 10 people.

1939: National Band & Tag invents Anti-Pix Chicken Glasses to help stop cannibalism in flocks. A year later in 1940, the “Jiffy” wing band is invented as an alternative to the “Zip” wing band.

1952: Now shipping worldwide, and profiting from the broiler industries’ economic boom, NB&T relocates from Orchard St. to a larger building on York St., Newport KY, which is where it still is today.

1957: C-LESS peepers are invented using aluminum to replace the chicken glasses

1968: The new “Tab End” wing band is invented. NB&T now employs 50 people.

1980s: National Band & Tag now has 3rd and 4th generation family members working together. NB&T continues to purchase surrounding land to expand the building.

1990s: NB&T celebrates 90 years of business in 1992.

 

Memorial Bird Bands

A great way to memorialize bird hunters who are no longer with us is with Memorial Bird Bands.

Customers use our Memorial Bird Bands as a memento to hand out to friends and family at the funeral. Some people will then put the bird band on their lanyard or keychain so that they can carry it around with them every day as a remembrance of their loved one. Hunting buddies or hunt clubs may want to pass out the bands amongst its members in honor of the deceased. Some will raffle off the memorial bands to help raise money for the family. We even had one customer put the memorial bands in honor of her son on ducks, so duck hunters would call for years saying they got one of the banded birds in tribute of her son.

 

Here are some of the ways our customers have customized their Memorial Bird Bands:

 

Memorial bird bands

IN LOVING MEMORY OF BRANDON MAUGLE 06/19/93-04/16/14

 

RIP MEMORIAL BANDS

JEFFERY WILKINS 4/23/1964 – 8/7/2016

LIVE LOVE DREAM MEMORIAL BIRD BANDS

STEVEN N. KENDRICK 02/09/99 – 01/27/19 LIVE – LOVE – DREAM

REST IN PEACE BIRD BANDS FOR HUNTERS

LEGENDS NEVER DIE RIP JB 12/2/12

DUCK MEMORIAL BANDS FOR LANYARDS

KELLY KEITH EADS 05/12/1997-01/21/2019 GET LOWER & SHOOT HIGHER

 

Click here to view our bird band sizes.

Bird bands come in multiple sizes and colors and can be customized with your text.

 

 

 

 

Designing Asset Tags for Proper Asset Management

WHAT IS AN ASSET?

Asset: “property owned by a person or company, regarded as having value and available to meet debts, commitments, or legacies.”

WHY DO ASSETS NEED IDENTIFICATION?

Some businesses may want a simple asset tag that has their logo and “Property of” on it to show that the asset belongs to them. Other businesses may want a more complex tag with a serial number or barcode so that they can track the asset. Asset tags are an important part of asset management. Asset tags can help to track an asset’s location, discourage theft, show ownership, track maintenance, repairs, and more. All of these reasons make Asset Tags valuable to both large and small businesses who want to have a proper asset management system in place.

 

design asset tags for your asset management needs

DESIGNING ASSET TAGS – WHAT TO CONSIDER:

  1. Where is your tag going to go on the asset, and where is the asset going to be? This will affect the size and shape of the tag you need, as well as the material. We have metal tags for flat surfaces, labels for curved surfaces, or flexible plastic tags. If your asset is going to be in a harsh environment, a heavy-duty metal tag will last longer than a thin plastic tag.
  2. How are you going to attach your tag to the asset? This will determine if you need holes, slots, or adhesive backing. This will also determine hole/slot size and placement on the tag.
  3. What info do you need the tag to relay? Logo, barcode, phone number, serial number, text, etc. are all things we can customize your tag with, but it’s up to you the tell us what information and numbering you want.

View more samples of Asset Tags and Asset Labels here.

 

Questions? Comment below or email us at tags@nationalband.com.